lupus guide
Home
Overview
Lupus Symptoms
Symptoms Overview
Fatigue
Fever
Skin Complications
Arthritis
Hematologic (Blood)
Cardiopulmonary
Renal Complications
Central Nervous System
Gastrointestinal
Ophthalmologic (Eyes)
Infection
Nutrition
Pregnancy
Serious Complications
Diagnosing Lupus
Treatment
Medication
Psychological Issues
Living with Lupus

Arthritis
Fibromyalgia
Depression
Hypertension
Diabetes



 

Lupus Eye Complications (Ophthalmologic)


lupus eyeEye disease occurs in approximately 20 percent of patients with SLE. In some cases, eye problems are related to the inflammatory process of lupus itself. In other cases problems may be due to drug treatment (corticosteroids or antimalarials) or may be a separate problem (glaucoma or retinal detachment). Blindness due to SLE occurs, but is rare.

Potential Problems:

  • discomfort
  • visual impairment
  • potential for injury
  • difficulty carrying out activities of daily living

The following eye problems occur in lupus:

  • A lupus rash may develop on the eyelids.
  • Kerato-conjunctivitis is “dry eye” related to Sjögren’s syndrome. Some people with lupus have Sjögren’s syndrome, which is an autoimmune condition that causes excessive dryness of the mucous membranes. People with lupus who have these symptoms require artificial tears to relieve dry eyes.
  • Uveitis (inflammation of the iris, ciliary body, vitreous gel and/or choroid) and scleritis may be part of the systemic inflammatory process of the disease.
  • Cytoid bodies are the most common retinal change in SLE. They reflect microangiopathy of the retinal capillaries and localized microinfarction of the superficial nerve fiber layers of the retina.
  • Glaucoma and cataracts may be caused by corticosteroids.
  • Antimalarials can damage the retina, which can impair vision (particularly color vision) or, extremely rarely, cause blindness. The risk of retinopathy is as low as 1 in 5,000.

Summary Potential Ophthalmologic Lupus Complications

  • a lupus rash on the eyelids
  • red eyes
  • loss of tears, dry eyes
  • mucus discharge from eyes, particularly upon awakening
  • sensitivity to light
  • change in vision
  • blurred vision
  • cloudy lens(es)
  • burning sensation in eyes

lupus eyes

 

About Us | Contact Us | Legal Disclaimer | Resources | Sitemap

© 2012 All Rights Reserved
This information is not a substitute for professional medical, legal, or financial advice from a qualified provider.